Number 96 in the official Rails list of top contributors of all time is a three-way tie between Rohit Arondekar, Genadi Samokovarov, and Gonçalo Silva. Just like the contributors site, I’ll look at each contributor in alphabetical order.

First, Rohit Arondekar’s contributions span from 2010 to 2014, and he’s one of the reasons Rails has such good documentation. He made significant contributions to the Getting Started Rails Guide and the documentation for ActiveSupport’s core extensions. He also got the Rails runner sending its output to stdout instead of stderr, improved generator output for models and migrations, cleaned up Markdown handling in Action View, and kept the test suite healthy. The first thing that popped up when I googled Rohit was his GitHub, but his GoodReads was a close second, where he’s reviewed over 150 books. A big thank you to Rohit for his hard work!

Next, Genadi Samokovarov started contributing in 2013 and his most recent commit was February 2019. He appeared on the Ruby Rogues podcast last year, talking about the web-console gem, which he created and which is now part of Rails. Charles Max Wood also interviewed Genadi for the My Ruby Story podcast just a little more than a week ago. In addition to the web console, Genadi’s added a Rack middleware to Rails which protects against DNS rebinding attacks, a :default option for mattr_accessor, and a method_missing delegation mechanism for decorators, plus tests and documentation. He’s also posted house music mixes on his SoundCloud, which makes for some good coding music. Thank you Genadi for your contributions!

Last, Gonçalo Silva’s contributions fit into the relatively compressed time period from 2010 to 2011. Gonçalo’s commits are unusually focused. For this project, where I’m thanking the top 100 Rails committers and highlighting their work, I built some code which shows me the files each contributor worked on. I’m only on the #96 slot so far, but Gonçalo’s commits are easily the most focused I’ve seen. They’re all about performance testing, including the tests run on MRI, Rubinius, YARV, and JRuby, and documentation to match. These days, Gonçalo works at Doist, makers of the extremely popular Todoist productivity app, among others. Thanks to Gonçalo for helping make Rails fast!